Knowledge: Case Studies

Vogue is undeniably one of the most iconic brands in the world. The fashion and lifestyle magazine was originally founded in the US in 1892, and began publishing in Britain in 1916. Today, Vogue is published across 26 different markets, and boasts a global monthly print readership of 13.4 million.

In recent years, Vogue has also progressed alongside the emergence of the new digital age to provide hugely popular online and social media content for its readers. Each month, Vogue’s online content receives 56 million monthly unique digital users worldwide, and has 141 million followers across its social platforms.

The Vogue sites had been quite separate until Vogue International was formed in 2017. It was created to provide digital stories – including text, photography, video and social stories – to the Vogues and also support with strategy. Sarah Marshall, Head of Audience Growth at Vogue International, introduces the company: “It makes sense to have this central team for both sending out content that all the different Vogues can publish, whether online or on social, or to support them in strategy.”

She continues: “When we’re covering a fashion show, or when we’re speaking to a big A-list celebrity such as Rihanna, we will talk to them on behalf of all the Vogues in the world for digital.” This means that if Vogue get an exclusive, all Vogues have access to the content for publication. “It just makes sense to negotiate centrally.”

Another purpose of Vogue International is to align the way Vogue is presented on its many social platforms. Marshall gives the example of Instagram: “We wanted to make sure that Vogue looked like a family of accounts across Instagram, so we hired someone from Instagram to achieve that. We wanted to be a central function for strategy as well as content.”

By Elizabeth Akass, Editor, Engage Business Media

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